Congo Bars Recipe

We are big cookie people around here but I don’t always have the patience to make a big batch of cookies. These Congo Bars are so easy to make and taste just as (or more) delicious as homemade chocolate chip cookies! Feel free to add any other fun ingredients.  We like to add chunks of caramel.

Serves: 20

Congo Bars Recipe

15 minPrep Time

30 minCook Time

45 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 cup flour
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup butter (softened)
  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 (11.5 ounce) package milk chocolate chips
  • 1 cup chopped pecans

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Sift flour, baking powder and salt in a large bowl and set aside.
  3. In another bowl combine butter and brown sugar using a mixer until blended.
  4. Add eggs, one at a time to sugar mixture, mixing on low in between each addition.
  5. Add vanilla and mix well.
  6. Add in the flour mixture and mix until combined, then fold in chips and pecans.
  7. Lightly spray a 9 x 13 inch pan with non-stick cooking spray and spread batter evenly into dish.
  8. Bake for 30 minutes or until top is golden brown.
  9. Do not over bake.

Nutrition

Calories

5735 cal

Fat

292 g

Carbs

789 g

Protein

77 g
Click Here For Full Nutrition, Exchanges, and My Plate Info
7.8.1.2
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https://media.sixsistersstuff.com/recipe/congo-bars-recipe/

(Recipe adapted from Bakerella)

 

 

 

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Comment on this Recipe

24 Responses to “Congo Bars Recipe”

  1. Oh my goodness! These looked so good and so easy that I just had to make them. They just came out of the oven and we are waiting to try them. I'm blogging about them too. I just love your website! It's my new go-to place for something new! Thank you!

    Lois

    http://inmysparetimelolo.blogspot.com/
  2. I saw your recipe and saved the link on my computer as a must try! And I am so glad I did, they are so good they are addicting. I changed the pecans to walnuts, but here is my post about them.

    http://lexslifeasanewwife.blogspot.com/2012/06/congo-bars.html
  3. Monique T
    I am super excited to try these, I have decided to give up on chocolate chip cookies and try making them into bar, I can make breads, and cakes and other good items, but I just can't get the chocolate chip cookies right, I hope this works!
  4. vikki buss
    I just made the conga bars, however I just dropped them by tablespoons onto my cookie sheets and they turned out fabulous as a cookie...thank you for sharing this recipe -- now I have a new cookie recipe to send with my daughter on Saturday's for her EMT training..
  5. I made these yesterday. They came out delicious. I did adjust a few things just for personal taste and to be creative. I used macadamia nuts because I don't like pecans. I also added some white chocolate chips and heath toffee bits, only because I had partial bags open and decided to get creative. My husband told me "save this recipe, it's a winner!" That's high praise from him!
  6. Glenda Golden
    Saw this recipe in our "hometown" paper. My husband pointed it out . The title caught my eye...along with the all brown sugar. In the 70's lived 18 months in Africa and had to learn to make my own brown sugar.... Brought back a memory. Do you know how it got the name "Congo Bars". Thank you for sharing.
    • There are several theories floating out there about the history of the Congo Bar. One of the first recipes for Congo Squares showed up in the 1940s on a package of Nestlé chocolate chips. It might have been a marketing gimmick to compete with the wartime “Tropical Bar” that Hershey’s had developed for soldiers. Others speculate that “Congo” refers to coconut and chocolate, both rather exotic ingredients in the early half of the 20th century. And yet other research links the Congo recipe to something served at the Congo Room, the name of the themed mid-century lounges that dotted the United States from Las Vegas all the way to Canton, Ohio. And the mystery deepens; some insist that Congo is short for ‘congregation,’ as the recipe was so popular in congregational churches, at bake sales or afternoon teas. One thing everyone can agree on is that it doesn’t get any better than a moist and chewy cookie bar that’s chock full of delicious stuff.

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